LE VILLAGE
FEMME COUCHÉELes Acrobates au CirqueLE VILLAGE
Georges Valmier
ANGOULÈME 1885 - 1937 PARIS
LE VILLAGE
1924
GOUACHE ON PAPER
SIGNED AT BOTTOM RIGHT
24.5 X 18.5 CM
PROVENANCE

PRIVATE COLLECTION, SWITZERLAND

CERTIFICATE

CERTIFICATE ISSUED BY DENISE BAZETOUX ON 10 JANUARY 2012

LITERATURE

TO BE INCLUDED IN THE FORTHCOMING SUPPLEMENT TO THE GEORGES VALMIER ŒUVRE CATALOGUE BY DENISE BAZETOUX

Georges Valmier’s early works clearly reflect the influence of Paul Cézanne, whose paintings he had become acquainted with as early as 1907 in the Cézanne retrospective at the “Salon d‘Automne”. Independently of Braque and Picasso, Valmier was already exploring cubist principles in 1909, composing his works in cubist aesthetic and prismatic facets. World War I caused a break in Valmier’s artistic development; it was not until 1917 that he once again turned to painting. In 1918 he met the art dealer and collector Léonce Rosenberg whose patronage would provide him with a basis for his creativity the rest of his life. The artist aspired again and again towards total abstraction while at the same time striving to maintain general harmony and balance. Valmier’s palette was consistently characterized by vibrant colours which, over the course of his career, were enhanced within the composition by curved forms endowing them with a virtually organic quality. In the early 1930s, Valmier once again devoted himself more insistently to abstraction and joined the group “Abstraction-Création”, whose founding members included Auguste Herbin, Georges Vantongerloo, Hans Arp, Albert Gleizes, Jean Hélion and Frantisek Kupka. In this period he also designed numerous stage sets and costumes for various plays by Paul Claudel, Georges Pillement and Max Jacob. In 1932 he participated in the Galérie Braun exhibition “Vingt-cinq ans de peinture abstraite”, and in 1935 the Parisian Galérie des Beaux- Arts featured Valmier’s works in a major exhibition entitled “Les créateurs du cubisme”. Two years later, the artist was to complete his last large-scale commission for the pavilion of the French railway company at the Paris World Fair of 1937.