LES ACROBATES AU CIRQUE
FEMME COUCHÉELes Acrobates au CirqueLE VILLAGE
Georges Valmier
ANGOULÈME 1885 - 1937 PARIS
LES ACROBATES AU CIRQUE
1927
GOUACHE AND COLLAGE ON PAPER
ESTATE STAMP LOWER LEFT
27 X 35 CM
GUTACHTEN

DENISE BAZETTOUX, MAISONS-LAFFITTE NOVEMBER 15TH, 2011

LITERATUR

THE ARTWORK WILL BE INCLUDED TO THE APENDIX OF THE CATALOGUE RAISONNE OF THE WORKS BY GEORGES VALMIER, WHICH IS IN PREPARATION  BY DENISE BAZETTOUX

In George Valmier’s early works, Paul Cezanne’s influence is clearly discernable as Valmier had already seen his works at the 1907 retrospective at the 'Salon d'Automne'. Independently of Braque and Picasso, Valmier deals with cubist principles already from 1909 onwards, composing his works using cubist aesthetics and prismatic dissection. 1 Due to the interruption caused by the First World War, George Valmier returns to painting only in 1917. This leads to his acquaintance with the art dealer and collector Léonce Rosenberg in 1918, under whose patronage Valmier will be creatively working for all of his life. Extreme abstraction always remains the artist’s goal, though without wanting to give up the overall harmony and balance in his art. Valmier’s works are rendered in vivid and strong colours, which in the course of his career are enriched by curved lines within the compositions, thereby almost obtaining organic qualities.


 Our collage of circus acrobats shows Valmier’s strong connection to stage and theatre, depicting the hustle and bustle in the circus ring in multifarious coloration. The circus artists are in the centre of the painting’s foreground. They are rendered only dimly and through delicate lines as we see them stepping into the limelight. The impression of space is created by the sequence of viewers and the gallery in the middle ground as well as by the folding of the backdrop-like shear walls. The single compositional elements of the collage are resulting from cubist dimensionality, whereas the protagonists are staffage figures. Yet their abstraction does not require the entire relinquishment of identity and personality. Valmier evokes the immanent impression of a cheerful circus attraction through the use of bright colours and through strong direct contrasts between the collage’s constitutional elements.


[1] Levy, André: Collection Décors et Couleurs; Album. N°. 1-2, Paris 1930-31, p. 17ff.